Monday, June 3News That Matters

State officials kill nearly 100 brown bears in effort to save caribou herd

State wildlife officials in Alaska have killed nearly 100 brown bears in less than a month in an effort to save a dwindling caribou herd. The Mulchatna caribou herd has declined by more than 90% in the past three decades, and officials say that brown bears are one of the main predators of caribou calves.

The Alaska Wildlife Alliance has criticized the state’s decision to kill so many bears, saying that it is not based on sound science. The group also says that the killings are cruel and unnecessary.

The state has defended its decision, saying that it is necessary to take action to protect the caribou herd. Officials say that the killings are being done in a humane way.

Biden administration cancels last leases in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The Biden administration has canceled the last three oil and gas leases in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The leases were sold in the final days of the Trump administration, and the Biden administration has been working to cancel them ever since.

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said that the cancellation is a victory for the Arctic Refuge and for the environment. She said that the refuge is a sacred place for Native Americans and a critical habitat for wildlife.

The cancellation is a major blow to the oil and gas industry, which had hoped to develop the refuge’s oil and gas resources. The industry has said that the cancellation will cost jobs and hurt the economy.

One of the Largest Caribou Herds in Alaska is Careening Towards Extinction

One of the largest caribou herds in Alaska is careening towards extinction. The Mulchatna caribou herd has declined by more than 90% in the past three decades, and officials say that it is now one of the most endangered caribou herds in the state.

The decline of the Mulchatna caribou herd is due to a number of factors, including habitat loss, climate change, and predation. Officials say that the herd is particularly vulnerable to predation from brown bears and wolves.

The state has been working to protect the Mulchatna caribou herd, but so far its efforts have been unsuccessful. Officials say that more needs to be done to save the herd from extinction.

US drilling approvals increase despite Biden climate pledge

The Biden administration has approved more drilling permits in its first two years in office than the Trump administration did in its first two years, according to a new report.

The report, which was released by the Center for Biological Diversity, found that the Biden administration has approved 3,237 drilling permits on federal lands and waters since taking office. That’s more than the 2,590 permits that the Trump administration approved in its first two years.

The report also found that the Biden administration has approved more drilling permits in two of Alaska’s most sensitive areas: the Arctic Refuge and the Tongass National Forest.

The Center for Biological Diversity has criticized the Biden administration’s record on drilling, saying that it is not doing enough to address the climate crisis. The group says that the administration should stop approving new drilling permits and invest in renewable energy instead.

The Biden administration has defended its record on drilling, saying that it is committed to addressing the climate crisis. The administration says that it is also committed to supporting the oil and gas industry, which is an important part of the US economy.

US will revisit Trump-era decision for Alaska rainforest

The Biden administration will revisit a Trump-era decision that allowed for large-scale logging in the Tongass National Forest, the largest intact temperate rainforest in North America.

The administration will also review a Trump-era decision that opened up the Arctic Refuge to oil drilling.

The decisions were made in the final days of the Trump administration and have been criticized by environmental groups.

The Biden administration has said that it is committed to protecting the environment and will review the decisions based on science and public input.